Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Hermes

He is the "Messenger of the Gods".

Never heard of him? Well, you probably would know him best as "The FTD" symbol.
Yah, He brings flowers. Flowers can be messages you know.

But more so, He is also the Son of Zeus. (How's THAT for lineage?) It is said that He is the God of travelers, protector of shepherds, cowherds, thieves, orators, and wit, literature and poets, athletics and sports, weights and measures, invention and of commerce in general."

I like how He governs "thieves" along with wit, literature and poets. Must be "the Folk Tradition", eh? :) Well, it's all forms of communication isn't it? He IS the Messenger of the Gods, and in fact He is the God of Communication in all its forms.

Also, Hermes carries the messenger's staff called the "Caduceus." It is the symbol for him, the planet Mercury, and also of Astrology and Alchemy.

The Caduceus is not to be confused with (but often times is) the Rod of Asclepius, which is the symbol of medicine and the healing arts.It is said that Hermes "invented fire, the lyre, the the alphabet, numbers, astronomy, a special form of music, the fighting arts and the gym, the cultivation of olive trees, weights and measures, and various other things."

Whoa. Busy guy! He invented FIRE?

Hermes helped Odysseus fight the magic of Circes, the Goddess by telling him to eat the poisonous Moly (which they figure by description is the lovely Snowdrop)

This flower is very dangerous for a mortal man to eat...but when given by a God's hands, it protected Odysseus from falling under Circe's spell. Snowdrops mean "Hope" , saving Odysseus from being turned into another animal and saving him and his crew.

Thus I think, Hermes started the whole "Communication with Flowers" thing...

Hermes is the bringer of news, wisdom, music, and protects from ghosts...

He is the one who guides the souls of the dead to the Underworld safely. (like Davy Jones in Pirates of the Carribean....only Hermes came first)

Hermes is the giver of dreams.

Hermes is the God of Roads and Boundaries. (Yes, him and St. Christopher :)

He is also a Phallic God and said to be the father of Pan and Hermaphroditus, who are notably very sexual and magical beings. (And really, when you combine music and sexuality you do get a very deep form of communication for all sexes, do you not? :)

You would need to make a list (read: CHART) of all his lovers and children! (Proving that communication IS sexy ;)

He charmed giants with his flute, rescued Goddesses and Nymphs, Killed the 1000 eyed Argus (who ALWAYS slept with some eyes open...how creepy is THAT?)

Hermes helped in battles, loved sheep (sometimes even LITERALLY...I mean, where do you think his son PAN came from?? )

Hermes invented foot racing and boxing and his winged feet are the symbol for swiftness and accurate travel. (His statue is at many stadiums and gymnasiums in Greece and throughout the world.)

So, really, it was with great intellect that Hermes was chosen to be the bringer of flowers and romance, eh?

By the way~

Hermes is also known to the Romans as Mercury....as most of Hermes traits were incorporated into the God Mercury's persona as well. Mercury is the ruling planet of Gemini.

I am Gemini and can certainly feel his influence in my life as a performer, writer, talker, singer, poet, lover, bard. Communication is my thing. I will read some of my original poetry this night at The Schweinfurth Museum of Art, as part of The 7th Annual Spring Poetry Reading. Hermes, I thank you for this gift and opportunity to share it!

"Hermes the Messenger of the Gods, Eloquence and Prudence, guide my words through pen and song."~ Merlyn

And thank you for letting us communicate to ourselves and others with flower!

If you are interested in learning more about what flowers say, then click here to visit a very informative website!

So, you can "say it with flowers, any day, but don't forget to say, "Thanks Hermes!!" :)

References, besides reading about him througout my life have come from here:

http://www.pantheon.org/articles/h/hermes.html

http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Hermes.html

http://www.theoi.com/Summary/Hermes.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes

1 comment:

Polly said...

Great post! I still sometimes confuse the Caduceus with the Rod of Asclepius. ;)